Emergency Kit

With regular large scale disasters already common in North America, it’s a good time to talk a bit about disaster preparation and how a 5 gallon bucket can help provide some good physical insurance against a catastrophic situation.

diy bucket emergency disaster kit

Image Credit: SafetyKitStore.com

A well designed emergency kit will contain the best bits of modern technology and healthcare packaged neatly in a carryable 5 gallon bucket.

Prepackaged Emergency Kits

The simplest way to invest in your five gallon insurance plan is to get your hands on a professionally built kit. Usually these kits are helpfully rated for a certain number of days and/or individuals. Prepared kits will usually contain both food and water (or water purification) and general emergency supplies such as flashlights and first aid. Here’s one popular emergency kit that condenses survival supplies for a family of 4 inside a single 5 gallon bucket.

5-gallon-bucket-survival-kit

Build Your Own 5 Gallon Bucket Emergency Kit

In many cases, it’s better to create your own 5 gallon bucket emergency kit. First of all, it gives you a certain intimacy with your kit – you know exactly what’s in there because you were the one who researched it and put it in there! If you’ve put something in there that you don’t fully understand how to use, you can learn that skill long before the flood or earthquake event that could make last-minute skill acquisition impossible. Secondly, putting together your own kit means you can custom tailor it to what’s important to you, your family and your community. For example, in our family we have a lot of allergies – some that can kill one of us very quickly. That’s why an EpiPen is a critically important part of our emergency supply but might not be relevant at all for other families. Lastly, assembling your supplies yourself could save you money. You’ll be able to include many household materials you already have, and you can get a better deal on the items you do need to buy by cutting out the middleman.

The DIY Disaster Preparation Bucket

This emergency kit comes from AlfredoEinsteino on Reddit – who we will call AE - and is published with his permission. At the end of this post is a list of every single item you see here so you can make this exact emergency kit for yourself. emergency-kit-5-gallon-bucket Keep in mind that this kit is one person’s collection of items that work best for him. It’s the right kit for AE but may not yet be the perfect kit for you. You should always tailor your emergency kit around what’s likely in your area and your family’s needs. 

Organizing the 5 Gallon Emergency Kit

AE has divided his emergency kit into a few broad categories to keep his supplies organized and well rounded:

  • General Supplies
  • Hygiene Supplies
  • First Aid Kit

Every item is listed in detail in a printed contents document. On the back is a list of important phone numbers such as relatives, insurance companies, local law enforcement, fire department, etc. emergency-kit-5-gallon-bucket-list Did you catch the line second from the top? It’s the most important detail on the loadout document – the date. This helps you remember when the bucket was put together so you can keep track of all your expiration dates. A good emergency kit can easily last 5 years or more, but not everything inside will be good for that long and may need to be replaced periodically. Again, the EpiPen example – they only last about 20 months from the day they are made. Replacing an expired EpiPen could be a life or death matter!

Shopping List: 5 Gallon Emergency Kit

The rest of this article will be a list of the contents of the bucket. You can download this list in an editable Word format by clicking here: 5 Gallon Bucket Emergency Kit It may be instructive to compare this list with the much higher calorie emergency kit from Mayday disaster preparation company. Humans usually need at least 2,000 calories every single day – which adds up really fast. Depending on your anticipated needs, you may want one or several food-geared buckets in addition to your emergency supply kit. I’ve linked some of the more unusual items that you might not find at your neighborhood hardware store.

General Supplies

general-emergency-kit-supplies

  • glow sticks (12 hrs)
  • flashlight
  • liquid candle
  • matchbooks
  • mylar thermal blankets (link)
  • hand warmers (link)
  • AM/FM radio
  • whistle and lanyard
  • sewing kit
  • blank notebook
  • pencils
  • extra batteries (for flashlight and radio)
  • zip ties
  • P-38 can opener
  • trash bags
  • N95 dust masks
  • duct tape
  • small tarp
  • paracord (link)
  • safety goggles
  • split leather gloves

Hygiene Supplies

Hygiene supplies are packaged inside their own separate bag. These basic supplies should look familiar – it’s similar to a toiletries bag you might take on vacation. hygiene-supply-kit

  • bar soap
  • kleenex
  • floss
  • baby shampoo
  • hand lotion
  • sunscreen
  • toothpaste
  • toothbrushes
  • feminine hygiene pads
  • comb
  • toilet paper
  • washcloths

First Aid Kit

The first aid box is packaged with a list of contents taped to the inside of the lid. Moist towelettes and antiseptic towelettes and latex gloves kept on top so you can clean your hands before digging through supplies. first-aid-kit-contents

  • basic first-aid guide
  • moist towelettes
  • antiseptic towelettes
  • latex gloves
  • acetaminophen (Tylenol)
  • ibuprofen (Advil)
  • aspirin
  • diphenhydramine (Benadryl)
  • loperamide (Imodium A-D)
  • burn cream
  • sting relief towelettes
  • hydrocortisone cream
  • triple antibiotic ointment (Neosporin)
  • cough drops
  • earplugs
  • instant ice pack
  • tweezers
  • nail clippers
  • scissors
  • digital thermometer
  • cotton balls
  • waterproof adhesive tape
  • gauze rolls
  • gauze pads
  • moleskin
  • band-aids
  • butterfly bandages
  • ace bandage
  • triangular bandage
  • hand sanitizer
  • Q-tips
  • petroleum jelly
  • RAD sticker (personal radiation dosimeter) (link)
  • potassium iodide (radiation emergency thyroid blocker) (link)

Additional Items Suggested by You

These pieces of kit weren’t included in the example bucket build above but are listed here by popular demand. (links will open in a new browser tab)

  • Lifestraw ultracompact Water Filter (link)
  • 24-inch Pocket Chainsaw (link)
  • 3600 calorie ration bars with 5 year shelf life (link)
  • 4-in-1 Emergency Gas & Water Shutoff Tool (link)
  • 12,000 Strike Firestarter and whistle (link)
  • Hand-crank Flashlight (link)
  • Everstryke Match (15000 uses) (get one free)
  • Foldable Drybags (link)
  • Foldable credit card knife (get one free)

Find more great suggestions on what to include in an emergency kit down in the comments. See also: more ideas for prepping with 5 gallon buckets.

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227 thoughts on “Emergency Kit

        • Tampons and Maxipads are not good for first aid. They have a chemical that prevents blood from clotting. You could bleed out if you use them.

          • I have heard different from Paramedics in Arizona…they carry them and I think your a lil off…We carry them in our first aid kits…They stop bleeds…Not cause Bleed outs!

          • Complete bullshit. No where on the box does it makes this claim and it would be illegal and dangerous to not list it. Someone on blood thinners could die. I have never once heard this other than here. Again complete bullshit

          • Need proof of this anti-clotting claim. Only facts I found from research regarding chemicals added to some of these products are deodorizing perfume, & the pesticides used while growing the cotton filler. Though pads are not “sterile”, the use of them on top of a sterile layer would work great for emergency control of bleeding. Such use has been taught & practiced for emergency use for decades. And as anybody knows: in life or death situations, you use what you have.

          • Yeah right, how many women do you know that “crash and bleed out” because their tampons and pads prevent clotting.

            Think before you speak jackass.

          • I agree with the maxi pad theory. I had a surgical wound on my inner thigh and the Dr’s office used a maxi pad as a bandage. Covered the whole wound. I continued using them as the wound got smaller and even went to the think panty liners later. I now have them in my first aid kit. They make wonderful emergency bandages.

      • knife, flint, bleach, peroxide, family meds, dehydrated foods , nuts, map and depending on where you live a 5 dollar snake bite kit, and crayons will burn for 30 min

  1. ** Also the bucket can be used as a floatation device in an emergency. Put a lid on, lower it down in water, and the air inside will float you.

  2. The bucket itself is a wonderful survival tool (carry water, make a water filter, for gathering and foraging, portable potty, and lots of other uses). So why not double your ability and set a bucket in a bucket. Would take up about another three inches of space and double your carrying capacity.

    • I have a suitcase carrier with wheels and a bungie cord – this was pre-wheeled suitcases!! Still have it and now it will be bungied to the bucket. I will also be on the look out for more in the event I need to “pull” more than one bucket at a time.

      • They still make wheeled carriers for hauling suitcases/car seats/whatever through the airport. Might take a bit more hunting, but they exist. (And are very handy with car seats.)

      • if you go on line to fishing supply store they make a bucket trolley with big wheels that’s easy to pull and easy to store but im sure it could be made at home just look online for the basic concept if anyones been near the ocean you’ll see fisherman on the beach with these trolleys

  3. I have crank flashlights and emergency band radios….(both can also use batteries). We also threw in a pack of individually wrapped sanitary napkins in the first aid portion-great sterile bandages! Small jar of vaseline: lip and skin moisturizer, lubricant on metal or plastic….and a small container of cornstarch/baby powder-anti-chafing-removes sand without water.

    • The only thing I’ve noticed about crank up radios and flashlights is that even they will eventually not hold a charge. It takes a while, but over time, they lose the ability to hold a charge.

  4. Super glue and oral gel or the generic benzocaine are must haves in my e-kit. Benzocaine can be used as a topical anesthetic and super glue can be used for everything including a liquid bandaid. :)

        • Have a plan. I could survive in the city same as in the country if prepared. I don’t mean a zombie apocalypse! :) First if I worked in an 8 story office building I’d find an office closet to stash a case of water, some energy bars and a set of gear in a backpack. Basically the same as in the country, waterproof matches, knife, cord, small tarp, etc. Second I’d memorize the floor plan, elevators, stairwells, etc. Even in the worst situation of roving gangs and no outside assistance I’d have a decent chance. In that case I’d block the lower stairwells with office furniture and collect & inventory assets, additional food, fuel, water, weapons and so on!

          • you can only survive in the city short term, the masses of people alone trying to survive per sq mile will cut your chances down. there will be no food source for the long term. So if you’re in the city when the SHTF get out quick – have a plan that takes you to a remote area and be self sufficient. And Alaska Boy above – Country girls will survive!

          • It is true what you said, city surviving is to a degree possible! A guy named just Selco [from THE forum] have described in intimate detail what it was like to survive the Bosnian war inside a big city, with military all around that bombed them. Selco [I think] stated that the worst place to be would be suburbs, and he now have a collective farm with friends. Because a lot of people died in fighting eachother, suicide and so on, there were just enough food and firewood for most.
            None will regret reading it, and you will love your food and safety every moment.

      • “Linda”
        First you need to realize that their are hundreds of scenarios to prep for. “Zombie Apocalypse” is probably going to be the last one on your list, right after “attack of the killer chickens”.
        First thing you need to look at is the situation you are responding to. Natural disaster, terrorist attack, war, social breakdown, economic collapse, government overthrow.
        Start a list of all the possible things “you” feel you need to respond to. After you get that list you need to come up with a game plan on how your going to respond to “each individual threat”.
        Are you staying put, running home, running across town, across the country, across the border? (remember that main roads will “ALWAYS” be the worst idea for travel. imagine rush hour, but with everyone going one way, and scared angry and confused).
        Plan your route if leaving. Get a local street map, and highlight your best routes. (travel them BEFORE SHTF). Get your game plan synced with whoever or where ever your running to.
        A bug out bag is almost a necessity if your serious about this. (well whats in a bug out bag? millions of possibilities…read the forums for all kinds of nifty ideas…but the only thing I will suggest is back up medication if your on any).
        OK…self defense…well, are you trained in self defense? If yes, then you may be able to fend off attack bare handed. But usually the bad guys are always more ruthless. Are you going to use a weapon? bat, knife, handgun, bazooka? Have you trained with that weapon? Dont just buy it and stick it in the closet/trunk. Train with it and get comfortable with it.
        The main thing is plan ahead….plan, plan, plan.
        It will be too late once something happens.

          • Plan your escape. Plan a backup plan. Then, Plan for it not to work. Your plan to evacuate will always interrupted by mass chaos. I hate getting stuck in regular rush hour traffic. Multiply that by (take a guess). If rush hour only has 20% of the population moving through, and those are usually going different directions, consider 100% trying to get out in the same direction, disobeying traffic laws, and panicking. If you are downtown, unless you get the message 10 minutes early, you’re stuck.

        • Warren is right. I lived in Alaska for ten years. Still have a place outside Anchorage and a cabin on 40 acres on the Kenai Peninsula. I have been prepping since the 80’s.

          My husband and I are in the Midwest to use the VA here. We are trying to finish our medical and dental needs to get back there ASAP. I am originally from Long Island, NY. If you are prepping there you might as well stock up in the same meds they put dogs to sleep with. You don’t have a chance. It is too crowded, the gun laws are insane, the locals are either clueless or gibsmedats.

          I you are serious about living get out of the cities and into a place away from population areas now. Better yet establish a community on land of like minded people and prepare together. It is very hard to survive even now truly out in the bush. My husband and I built a 16×20 cabin mostly on our own and it nearly killed us in our early 50’s. But we did it. We lived through two brutal winters off the grid before coming here. The only brightspot is supplies expensive there are cheap here. Harborfreight comes to the door every month. I shop the awesome deals. If the SHTF before we are back and settled in a cabin on our property with our supplies we do not expect to survive a true catosrophe. And, my husband was Ranger/SF for almost 21 years and saw what he calls the crapholes of crapholes all over the world. He has helped set up refuge camps and saw the horror of lawlessness.

          Sorry for the doomer opinion. Just my insight from living in NY to Alaska. City to off the grid. Doing without takes years to learn. Getting out of population areas needs to be done before everyone else gets the same idea, etc.

    • Then fill us in with you wisdom, that is what we are here for, to learn. If you are just flappin your gums, just shut up & go away.

      • Excellent point!

        It’s a combination of being “grounded” (aka- having your sh*t together), living in the present moment, and (ultimately) being spiritually prepared.

        Fear doesn’t help at all.

    • Dude- how about trying to be part of the solution, and not part of the problem. These folks are already scared, they don’t need that kind of feedback. If you can’t help, don’t hurt.

    • ROFL. You never know who will do what when it comes right down to it. The “most obvious” to survive could be the first to go and the one everybody though would bite it first could be the wild card and outlive everyone else. All you can do is prepare, then at least you will have done what you can and will stand a better chance. ……… Don’t forget the guns to protect what you have stockpiled. =)

      • Taylor, Taylor, Taylor. I think it’s obvious that what works for AK wouldn’t work in TX. In TX, you don’t have sled dogs do you? So when you tickle the keyboard, use some common sense and put something down that will further the process.

    • 2 years in the bush makes you an expert? Wow… News flash even those living out in the “Bush” are going to have hard times in AK. Think about this. EVERYTHING is shipped from the lower 48, and stores up here are only running on 3-5 days of supplies. Who are you going to buy supplies/things from?

      So in other words where are you going to get fresh fruit and veggies? Carrots, squash, and cabbage are only going to carry you so far. Most of the fish are going to be killed off in the first years as someone upstream will die and by neglect of there site poison down stream. Most of the moose, and caribou are going to take a huge beating by the other 50,000 people in the back woods. (Yeah there are at least that many out there, do the math, and look at how much the bush pilots fly around out there.)

      So don’t get to delusional, or high and mighty there sparky. People all over are going to have a tough time. Those that already live on the fringe are going to find it even that much tougher.

    • i was born and raised in the mtn’s of vermont and i am a ” combat arms/combat trained vet ” i know full well wtf it will take to ” survive ” and how to ” survive ” even though atm i live in a large city i can and i will survive everything comes down to the will and the know how and training its one thing to just ” stock up ” on stuff but if you do not know how to use what you have then its worthless junk!!! yes i have 3 B.o.B’s and i am working on one for my car that will support my self and my wife for a min of 3 days 4 days if i push it now getting to wtf you said about ” we are all going to die ” well everyone will die at some point thats the facts of life some sooner then other’s i plan on being around for some time to come its the ones who are not prepaired that will die first then once the dust settles the rest will work things out one way or another

    • warren explain why they are going to die…just saying that does not tell them a thing. Is it that you know what would help or are you just commenting to be critical with no explanation for your question?

      Live in Alaska

    • You were ‘in the bush for 2 years in Alaska’? What was it in life that brought you to the bush in Alaska? Running from savage Eskimos? Polar bear trouble? Snowball fight with your big sister that got out of hand?

  5. I see two things that are not in here. Come on people! You NEED a knife and a fire starter. Doesn’t matter where you live those two things are essential!

    • They have matches in there, but that is only going to be good for a day or two. Most people I know can’t even start a decent fire with matches, let alone with anything else.

        • Pro-tip: You probably know about the residue that a clothes dryer produces. After having dried your towels, collect the residue and put it in a small can. The residue is really flammable. You can also dip cotton balls in vaseline. These are all great to get a fire going. You will still need something to get the fire started though, and a magnesium stick is a great tool for this. Light, inexpensive, and works regardless of temperature, humidity, and wind (unlike gas-lighters).

          • Experienced-tip from a beginner: I made some great fire starters that work fast and easy. I roll dryer lint in a used dryer sheet. Shove all of that into a toilet paper roll. Cover the toilet paper roll in Vaseline and then put it in a sandwich bag. This works really great and works fast with dry wood. But believe me from experience, if the wood is wet it does not work that good. In fact, it didn’t work at all. Maybe if we would have had a hand trowel or small shovel and dug a hole, filled it with dry leaves it might have worked because that could have helped with drying the wood out some but we didn’t have a trowel or small shovel in our kits. Lesson learned! I have since found that Insta-fire is water resistant and will even burn in snow. So your best bet is to get some for your kit.

      • Dot brooks is right about the corn chips being a good fire starter. Another thing that I think will help if the SHTF is knowing as much as you possibly can about natural medicines. If things were to get really bad for an extended period of time you can count on not being able to find conventional medicines anywhere. So knowing what plants could help reduce things like fever, or what can become a disinfectant, could be very helpful.

    • You can use cotton balls OR make your own homemade firestarter (dryer lint stuffed into a toilet paper roll). I have an altoids tin that I have converted into a stove (a mini stove that fits PERFECTLY in this!and you can use discarded sanitation wipes to help start fires too.

      But I think MOST people would want to use matches/lighter/starter kit and I would also put a knife in there too… even a small hatchet if it fits as well!

  6. Use a menstrual cup instead of pads. Made of silicone, they will take up much less space and are reused the whole period and can be just rinsed or wiped out until they can be properly washed. You buy it once and it lasts 10 years, so start using it now to learn how to use it so an emergency situation it will be no big deal. You save loads of money.

    • The menstrual cup won’t be the best idea if the conditions you are in are not very sanitary. It could be good if you have clean conditions and it works for you. A couple of pads in the kit would still be a good idea, just in case.

    • In my gunshot would trauma kits and my first aid trauma kit I carry several OB tampons for gunshot wounds. Fast temporary solution to prevent bleeding out until you can get to medical help or a position where you have some time to take care of the wounds properly.

      Also, an AR-7 (.22 cal) rifle is not a bad idea either. Along with some ammo and a handgun or two.

      • Tampons are a good idea. They originated in World war II for gunshot wounds. Someone brought them home wife got smart and wa-la!

  7. Check out some readily-available antibiotics intended for use in fish tanks. Sounds funny, I know…Google it, and learn. (Beats a painful death via infection).

    • I’m prone to sinus infections and the docs always give me amoxicillin. Between the visits and the scripts… it cost me a fortune. lol I wised up *years* ago and regularly order Fish Mox Forte. My brother in law is a pharmacist and he told me there’s NO DIFFERENCE between a prescribed 500 mg amoxicillan capsule and a 500 mg Fish Mox Forte capsule. Whenever I feel the infection coming on.. I just take the capsules for a couple days.. and ::POOF:: gone! No visits to the doc and no script needed! Get them at Revival Animal Health. [peruse the antibiotic section]

      • Be careful using antibiotics “just a couple of days” or until you feel better. If you knock the infection down and not out, the remaining bacteria become genetically immune to that antibiotic. A couple of times around, and you have a totally ineffective antibiotic because the infection no longer responds to it. You need to take it through what would be a full course- 5-10 days depending on the meds. Google “superbugs.” We now have a TOTALLY drug resistant tuberculosis in Asia. Vancomycin is considered one of the “big guns.” There is an enterococcus that is now resistant to that. There is a more well-known Staph that is resistant to methicillin, which was widely useful against it up to now- MRSA. There are more… Just don’t use antibiotics indiscriminately, please.
        –Nursing Instructor and RN for 36 years…

  8. You can also install a cushion on the top of the bucket to use it as a seat. It’s an afterthought, but we used 5 gallon buckets at girl’s camp to store things in and then turned them into chairs for around the campsite. Easily portable and helps if you need a rest. It still works without, just not as comfortable.

    • that is why she said get used to them now so you can use them later. Pads aren’t going to last very long while the cups last years. :P

    • I think I saw them at either Sam’s or Costco – didn’t have the fancy label but it was stocked – cost several hundred dollars (or more – might have been close to $1,00) I think – go to Lowe’s or Home Depot & the buckets are cheap & then stock it your needs.

    • If your town has a Firehouse Sub they sell the food-safe buckets with lids for 2.00. They get pickles in them & they clean them up before they sell them. The only thing is they are not always available. You have to be there when they are emptied. First come first served.

        • subway doesnt have pickle buckets anymore at least not in arizona…… why would you want to have EVERYTHING smell like pickles . that smell never comes out

          • most large grocery chains who make baked goods in-house have perfectly clean, sweet-smelling white buckets to sell used, once they use the frostings that come packed in them. No pickle smells there! I used to use them when I bought my dry beans by the gunny-sack full!

    • Of course you can order buckets in many colors and gamma lids would be helpful also. But locally, I get my red (an white) buckets from Atwoods for about $3, lids are extra, has logo printed on them. Home Depot has orange buckets with logo, but I have also bought light blue, lavender, and aqua. I have seen white, blue and maybe yellow for sale at Walmart. I use buckets in my pantry for bulk items or extra protection in case a mouse gets in there. Different colors make for fast/easy identification.

  9. Vice grips, small crowbar/Wonderbar, leatherman tool, hammer/hatchet and of course, you’re already carrying a defensive tool, right?

    • that’s a lot of weight. if you have to carry all that, you’d need a tool belt of some sort too. you don’t want all that on the end of your arm. LOL

  10. I’d be scared to use ear plugs in an emergency situation unless I had someone guarding. even in a “shelter” I’d think I’d have to be scared of attack or theft.

  11. I have the greatest time reading comments. So absolutely diverse. Ok just my 2 cents worth to add to the chaos. Where ever there is land that will only support a limited amount of mammals. There is gonna be boundary issues. We are, and have been for a while now, Zombies. Maybe not literally but none the less. (The walking dead.) Have a good day all …. But the person who is willing to kill without hesitation is gonna grab your gear. :P

  12. I would also add some fish hooks & some fishing line. You can tie it to a long stick and have a fishing rod instantly! Pull some leaves back and find worms and there ya go! Instant bait!

    • Line fishing is the most inefficient method of gathering food. To seasonal, and hit and miss. (Hence called fishing and not catching.) :)

      By a small gill net and learn how to use it without breaking the local laws. (Most are not legal any more but if it is SHTF then I think there are bigger worries than someone illegal fishing. I hope)

  13. The Rule of “3’s”

    3 seconds without blood circulation.

    3 minutes without air.

    3 hours without proper clothing or shelter in extreme weather.

    3 days without water.

    3 weeks without food.

    PS-
    I highly recommend buying a decent, inexpensive water filter/purifier.

  14. Are y’all packing for an emergency or a overnight camp out? No firestarter, no parachute cord and other supplies for making a shelter, nothing to catch or cook food, etc.
    Yes, Kelly, if I still needed such stuff, I would start learning to use “menstrual cups”. What if this emergency lasts months or years?

  15. I employee 5 gal buckets in my preps. with a large family I have a bucket for toiletries which doubles as an emergency porta-potty, one for hygiene and ne for each of my 2 dogs. My water and food needs are to great for 5 gal buckets alone so I use larger tubs in addition to say my Wise food buckets.

    • I love that you made buckets for your dogs. What kinds of supplies do you have for them? Obviously food, but what else that would fill up a 5 gal bucket for each of them?

  16. 4 strike anywhere matches wrapped in cotton ball then dipped in wax will start a fire even in the wind. easy to carry in medicine bottles

  17. I bought the life straw. drink from any water source.. even scuzzy pond!
    hand crank/solar emergency radio with flash light and phone charger. currently use it for camping and the beach!
    I’d pack change of clothes, matches, 3 wick candle for light and small head source, gallons of water, and large wool blanket.
    I plan for somewhat long power outage in my home, not apocalypse…. yet.

  18. So the advantage of the bucket vs. a backpack seems to be the bucket itself. Isn’t there a collapsible bucket out there somewhere that could fit into a backpack? I love buckets too, but seriously they’re not that practical without a vehicle. Or with 2 buckets you could use that oxen thing and carry one on each shoulder. I predict a “Stow n go emergency bucket kit” ,specifically made for the person who has everything – except a bucket to drag it around in…

      • We have a backpack for everyone in the house(including one for the dog) incase we need to travel on foot etc. The back pack has a change of clothes, multi-tool, matches, a small first aid kit, etc.- mostly everything we would need to survive but on a much smaller scale not so in-depth. It wouldn’t keep us alive forever but hopefully provide till we could get to a better situation. However we also have a bucket which is much more stalked in the way of first aid and some other items we probably could live without if it were life or death. mostly I wanted the bucket because you can buy a “mock toilet lid” it is similar to a toilet seat, you can get the biodegradable waste bags that fit nicely in the bucket and use as a bathroom, which I think is the best option since it can be dangerous to defecate just anywhere because that could contaminate things like water and soil you may want to plant it later.

    • You can find collapsible buckets at Army surplus stores, Sportsman’s Guide and Cheaper Than Dirt online. Look under Military Surplus.

  19. Lots of good reasonably priced solar units that will also charge your phone (In case there are any towers still standing). Be fully aware that refilling the propane generators at remote cell tower sites is NOT a priority in an emergency. The sites will not work after the first week or so. Look up the Biostove on line. Neat unit, but pricey. Invest in a crank operated light, or a solar one. If you have kids, light when it is dark is just reassuring when the wheels come off your world. Please put a deck or three of cards in your kit. Once the batteries die on their game, the kids will want more entertainment. If you are worried about the coming emergency, whatever it is, then get a low priced but sturdy little RV/tent trailer and keep it ready.

  20. The thing I would change is I would buy Johnson Baby Head To Toe Wash and not just Johnson’s Baby Shampoo and Bars of soap…where are you gonna put those messy bars of soap after you start using them.

    • While liquid soap can be easy to use, those plastic bottles can leak or might lose the cap. A bar of soap can be set out to dry, or wrapped in your wash cloth or put in a soap box. Bar soap can also be shaved to dissolve in water to wash out socks/ underware, etc, can also be rubbed along a zipper to help it work better or on the bottom of your cookware for easier cleaning.

  21. I lived in the city, my edc: 2 micro flashlight, shower cap, small folder, lighter, bandaid, sharpie in red, 5ft cord (bright pnk), flashdrive (containg copy of personal important document), cableties, whistle, ziplock bags 3 differentsizes), 5ft ducttape rolled on to sharpie, blackberry, 8″ tablet, powerbank to recharge

    • A blackberry? an 8 ” tablet? You will be the first one we’ll find dead along the road somewhere. Please fill your pockets with beef jerky too…the wild dogs love it.

      • Major Gallon,

        If you don’t know that an edc is different from a bob then you need to do some more research.. An edc in the city will also be different from one carried by a rural person.

  22. I love the idea of 5 gallon kit, similarly I use ammo box that I got from range. Its air tight, durable, light, free, comes in dull OD milspec, easy to handle, floatable, and again durable.

  23. hello i just wanted to let you know that you dont have to buy a bucket if you ask the bakery department in a grocery store they will most likely give you some of the buckets they use for frosting they just throw them away i work at a krogers an that were i get my buckets from :)

  24. Hi. I put together the emergency bucket featured here. Lots of good points in this thread and great suggestions! Everybody’s emergency supplies ought to be individualized to anticipate your personal needs and the emergencies likely in your area. I put this bucket together for my brother’s family for a Christmas present. I live in a suburban area and a couple of summers ago there were some serious wildfires that necessitated immediate evacuation of entire neighborhoods. Thus the bucket was created. The supplies therein aren’t meant for long-term survival (probably only a couple of days, tops), nor for a walking bug-out. I meant it to include supplies useful for minor bugging-in emergencies like a power outage, or to carry easily to a car for a quick evacuation. I knew my brother had a emergency backpacks of 2 days of food and change of clothes for each member of his family already, so the bucket was meant to supplement that. I filled it with useful things that you might not think to collect when the fire department is telling you to get out in ten minutes. I admit, a bucket isn’t portable for long distances, but I chose a bucket over a bag because it’s waterproof, rodent-proof, and easy enough for an 8- or 10-year-old to carry a short distance. I tried to keep the weight down, so I didn’t include heavy tools although there was room for some. And I thought the bucket itself might come in handy in a worst case scenario if the sewer system ever failed (we live in an earthquake prone area) and it wasn’t possible to immediately get to a shelter with working sewer. (I saw several different brands of emergency potty buckets for sale when I shopped around for supplies and they all looked like overpriced, regular 5-gallon buckets with toilet seats attached. The waste chemicals that can be bought separately smelled very strong and I don’t think I’d like to store them long-term with any of my other supplies.) One thing I’ve since thought to add that hasn’t been mentioned in the comments yet is a deck of cards. Sometimes real emergencies involve lots of boring waiting.

    • Great suggestion on the deck of cards! Cards probably are the most entertainment for the greatest number of people per ounce.

      • Coloring books and crayons will keep the kids busy and can double as candles if needed. I also have vitamins in our BOB’s…
        Bullets are so hard to come by.( I’m a single Mom of an 11 year old boy,) We have bows and arrows and Sling shots ( He and I have both learned to hit target really well) with marbles .Great for small game hunting or if needed ,protection. Is there a SHTF people connector? The rest of my Family think I’m crazy. I’m just trying to connect with someone that is in the same mind set , that can be of help to me. There is only so much that I can do alone…I’m old school, I have been canning all I can, and have enough food/water to shut -in, I worry about the protection factor….I’m in NC/ Va area…

  25. I have a go bag, but I’m thinking a bucket would be great to keep in my vehicle. I also have a hatchet, gun, and a taser. I’m not messing around. I’ve read through all the comments, taken notes and had some good chuckles. Seriously though, if you do not have anything constructive or nice to say – don’t say anything at all. You are just wasting yours and our time. Everyone is worried about carrying a bucket, goodwill has luggage with the luggage wheels, almost always. I’m totally rigging my bucket with wheels and a better back pack style strap. Good luck everyone. :)

      • An A.L.I.C.E. Pack frame with shelf is more than enough to carry a 5 gallon bucket and is also good when on water patrol if not carrying supplies. I currently have an EDC (get home bag) I carry everyday that can support me for two days with food water and means to make more water as that is critical in the South along with that is also my means of being defensive.. In my truck to SUPPLEMENT my EDC is a 5 gal bucket with additional items that will aid in making life more comfortable should i choose to take it with me if I have to foot it.. lets not fight among each other as to who will live or die.. we all will at some point lets just share and help each other until that day comes.. Keep your head up and your powder dry.. good luck everyone..

  26. Important to include a few days worth of prescriptions. Some have serious side effects if stopped cold turkey. another important item that only 1 person mentioned was copies of vital documents. That person has theirs loaded onto a flashdrive … very clever, minimal space required. Also, I think antibacterial gel is important if you’re not near a water source to clean hands. Someone noted it can be used as a fire-starter.

    • As soon as I read about storing important documents on a flash drive I immediately wondered how it would be used if the grid is down and computers are not useable.

    • I have several flash drives in my kit just because I like different stuff on different flash drives and it leaves room to add more. I am a genealogist so I have one for each one of my grandparents families information and photos, one for all my families personal information and our home, home and property content and car information, one for all my pictures and scrapbooking stuff, and one with all my survival, homesteading, first aid, animal husbandry, herbs, foraging and essential oil stuff on it.

  27. Instead of using 5 gallon buckets, I used an ice chest that had wheels and a pull handle. The top of the ice chest has a latch, too, so the top stays closed. It’s easier to move (I just roll it) and it also will allow for 2 people to sit on it. I was surprised that I didn’t have to get a HUGE ice chest, either, to hold what I needed. I have smaller rolling ice chests for each of my kids, too.

  28. Good luck all. My wife and I are both disabled and living in a nursing home. We will probably be among the first to go. May god be with you.

    • God bless you Steve. You brought me to tears with your honest and straight forward comment. No matter what may happen ,I will pray for you and your wife.

    • Don’t give up so easy. Many elders have knowledge of how to live back before we had all of the present day electrical devices. You could hook up with a younger group and your knowledge would be invaluable. One alone will have a hard time surviving. You MUST leave a big city or urban environment IMMEDIATELY! PERIOD! A small group will have a better chance of survival because you are going to have to have someone on watch at all times and be prepared and able (and willing to do whatever is necessary!) to protect your supplies. Starving humans will eventually become the greatest threat as time goes on in a prolonged or lengthy situation. I have already bugged out in a motor home to a secluded location (I carry A LOT more than a bucket load!) and we are assembling a group who have various experience, knowledge, and varied supplies. Securing our perimeter is our primary concern, everything else falls under that! Your mental attitude will either be an asset or your death. Stay strong and fight to live with your last ounce of strength. The longer you last the less people that are going to still be alive. After 3 months the majority will be dead if we simply lose power. Now in the case of a pandemic or major natural disaster there may be no chance for humanity to survive. In that case just accept the inevitable and care for and calm others (especially children) and make peace with your Maker. Being a Believer will be a strength and mental help if it truly is an end of the earth scenario. Good luck and God Bless, regardless of the situation!

  29. The diva cup will last a while if you add a small pack of baby wipes for sanitizing them. That way if you are in an unsanitary event you can still clean your personal care products and if you can boil water that will also work. I agrew that you should still pack pads for medical reasons though.

    • My dad is a retired firefighter and EMT. He mentioned one time that all the trucks carried heavy flow pads to help with serious wounds. He said that it helped staunch the flow of blood.

  30. By all means have buckets, even an empty one on the outside of the stocked one.. But we also have a backpack for each member of the family, packed with the lightest but effective supplies possible. There are 2 bottles of water in each, just for temporary use on the 1st day.. Iodine or small container of bleach for water purification. Enough meal replacement bars for a week, dehydrated meal packets, etc.Also, those foil-ish heat retaining blankets and small fold- up plasticemergency tents. We’ve considered a gas mask per person in case of a chemical spill. Protective weapons, although nothing would be fool-proof in a mass attack. Having faced a home invader, I know that a very realistic looking gun can be enough to stop an attacker cold. Also have a taser, mace, and a knife. A leatherman knife too,. Some rope, duct tape, super glue. A month’s supply of prescriptions, restocked regularly. Antibiotics. Lightweight hand crank flashlight and small regular one. Matche. Ponchos. All fit in 3 backpacks. Items are divided up. Again, emphasis on minimum weight.

    • I haven’t done this yet but am going to add the following to my kit. I seen this on Youtube. You get a clear cup and lid like a cappuccino cup or something from McDonald’s or somewhere and put a hole in the bottom of it about a size of a nickel. Then put in a coffee filter in it then layer charcoal and sand until you get to the top and put in another coffee filter. Use the lid for storage. You can pour water through this to purify it. This is 3 ways of purification in itself but i would also be tempted to use boiling also. You can also store bleach in an empty visine bottle but make sure you label it good with a black permanent marker.

      Ratio of Clorox Bleach to Water for Purification

      2 drops of Regular Clorox Bleach per quart of water
      8 drops of Regular Clorox Bleach per gallon of water
      1/2 teaspoon Regular Clorox Bleach per five gallons of water
      If water is cloudy, double the recommended dosages of Clorox Bleach.

      Only use Regular Clorox Bleach (not Fresh Scent or Lemon Fresh). To insure that Clorox Bleach is at its full strength, rotate or replace your storage bottle minimally every three months.

      http://www.csgnetwork.com/h2oemergencypurifycalc.html

  31. if you’re planning on a small emergency, tornado, fire, earth quake you might also think of keeping some cash in your bucket….atm’s and banks may not be available or if you are evacuated some place where you cant get to your bank you will have some cash for things you may not have thought of or run out of.

  32. When we had floods in Houston, we actually had to use our 72 hour kits. Here are a few things that we found. It is better to have something that you can carry rather than something that rolls. Especially for kids. there is no way we would have been able to roll anything though mud or ripped up cement and over all of the trees, branches, and other that was in the road. You don’t always have the luxury of being able to drive and sometime have to walk through a bit of water. One thing that we really wished we would have had…along with most others is Gold Bond. When you are wet or cant bathe or its hot, Gold Bond is like gold!!! We also wished we would have put in a little travel size of laundry detergent to wash out undergarments. Just a few thoughts.

    • Flashdrive is to be able to provide copies of documents, such as ID, policy #’s etc to get needed assistance from FEMA or other agencies. I would think that having a photo of family members, pets, your home as it is now would all be helpful. As well as brief medical records, important phone #’s. It is not meant for the all out disaster of the world, but for evacuations – perhaps fires, explosions, natural disasters, etc.

  33. It would be nice to hear from more people who have actually lived thru a disaster, like the last one who knows first hand what it’s like.

  34. Don’t forget an extra pair of eyeglasses, maybe even dark glasses (if you live in sunny area), strong gloves for moving aside debris, knee pads for those of us who can’t kneel comfortably.

  35. From someone who has went thru two major tornados.Last one was the April 27th,2011 tornado that tore apart several communities, and towns, Cordova and Sipsey. EVERYONE NEEDS AN EMERGENCY PREP. Always before bad weather or any kind of situation.Put gas in your car, pull out as much cash as you can. You will not have power. You will not have homephones or cell phones. And you possible will not have water. You will need to stay in place during severe weather. Unless it is your house that gets hit. I know keep flashlights batteries, oil lamps, matches, propane for the grill. I fill extra plastic storage tubs with water and put lids on them and stack in the bathroom. That is where you need large amounts for flushing toliet and bathing. I also have it stacked in the kitchen. Also have cases of bottled water. Tarps to put on roof in case of leaks. Plywood, rope, several gas cans and large coolers. These we used to ferry ice, food, fuel to our neighbors. The one thing everyone needed and actually, cried over was chainsaw oil. The one thing wehadwashelp to haul trees and food. Everyones freezers were defrosting. I do keep easy to eat food like protein bars etc, stckpiled. I never let my medicine go low either. You could not fill scrips. I had friends homes get hit by the tornado, and they lost family. My aunt’s cousin died. It has been a long road and looking back on that day, you realize what you can live without. I work in emergency services and everyone helped each other. That is what I saw in each situation. I personnally did not suffer any losses, but had to deal with my friends insurance company. You can file a claim, the groundwork, for another person just by name on policy, and address on policy at the local office. And lastly have more than one meeting time and place for family. We could not access many areasdue to trees and power lines down for days. Some places for almost a week.

    • I agree with you, I live in Florida and we get the Hurricanes. One thing that I found that has been a great help is something called I think it’s Bathtub Bob, It’s a giant, heavy plastic bag that go’s in the bathtub, and holds like 50 gals of water, it has a pump on it to get the water out. For those of you who don’t want to spend that kind of money, buy a new 55 gal trash can, clean it out, then wipe with bleach and air dry. Fill with water, and put the cover on it and you have 55 gal of fresh water to use, if you have a garage put it in there, then you can just dump it, as it will be very heavy.

  36. I realize there is limited space but essential oils can also be used to replace some of these things. My 2 would be lavender and eucalyptus. If anythimg, in a stressful situation something that could help you relax would be helpful if you have anxiety. I look at this as a 72hr kit and it is great! Totally redoing the one I have now! Thank you for posting.

  37. I have one thing to add…a walking stick comes in handy, not only to assist in walking, but if you’re in a flooded area, manhole covers are likely to be off. I lived through the Johnstown flood of ’77 and remember someone falling into the current of one that was uncovered. A walking stick can be used in many ways, from poking the ground under water, using it for fishing,to self defense if necessary…use your imagination.

    Also, something like newspaper to use for kindling, aloe gel, compass, mirror (to check yourself for ticks, etc on your back; can also be used for signaling of course).

    • I use old, useless CDs for my signal devices. If you are signaling an airplane or ship, hold the CD up to your eye and find the airplane thru the center hole. If you can see it, it can see you. Also they don’t break like a glass mirror.

    • The walking stick is a great idea ad a great survival tool. Beside the uses noted, it can be used as a pole for a shelter, can be used over the shoulders to more easily carry 2 survival buckets. If another person in the group has one, they can be used as handles for making a litter. They can be used to extend your reach. A small packet with a screw in hook, screw in eye and screw in prod can make it more useful. It can extend your reach up by several feet and be used with a piece of cloth as a signaling device. It'[s uses are limited only by your imagination.

  38. I like this idea but the one thing for sure I would change would be the use of latex gloves in the first aid part. I keep Nitrile gloves, even though I don’t have a latex allergy, I might help someone else who does and the last thing I want to do is cause them more problems by exposing them to latex.

    Another thing I would ad is a CPR mask, even if you don’t know how to do CPR someone might be nearby that does & there is nothing worse than attempting CPR when someone is aspirating.

    One last thing on the medical side, I would put a small bottle of honey in the kit. Multiple uses for honey.

    Good job!

  39. One thing I would seriously consider is replacing the hard bucket handle with a soft one – Id use cord with a hosepipe handle. How to do this would depend on the buckets design, as ideally it would be better to have no leaks or holes in the body of the bucket.. But when it comes to carrying a bucket, nothing is worse than a non-flexible bucket handle.
    I would probably also attempt to make the handle double as backpack straps.

  40. One thing that is important to mention, but I might have missed, is that you need to check expiration dates on everything that has one (and some that don’t like moist towelettes which dry out) and replace the expired items before they expire. Emergency kits can get really expensive if you don’t rotate the contents with new and especially if you don’t actually use the items that have a shelf life.

  41. An earlier comment about planning for different scenarios makes a lot of sense. Lots of good suggestions. I’m in search and rescue and there are a few “musts” regardless. Check out the REI site for a list of “10 essentials”. In a major disaster where you can’t shelter in place, and you may only have moments to escape, everything has to be “grab and go”, including weather appropriate clothing and sturdy, broken-in shoes and a 2nd pair of socks. And don’t forget your critical papers. You want as little weight as possible without risking your health or safety. Think minimalist and multi-purpose. Google “ultra lite hiking or backpacking” for ideas. In a true disaster, it’s NOT going to be like car camping. Make sure you’ve mastered the use of everything you’re planning to include. Set up a tarp shelter in your backyard and spend the night in it. Trust me… it gets pretty miserable fast! Pack a couple of large, contractor weight trash bags. You can stuff them with leaves to keep you off the ground and they work as a poncho, too. You need to stay dry and manage your body temp. I love my light weight down jacket that stuffs into its own bag and my bivy sack. Sunscreen, bug repellant, hat, high quality multi-tool, and a way to navigate – you can’t always get a signal for the tech toys, even on a good day. When my son was younger, periodically we’d have a “stay-cation” over a long weekend and live out-of-the-bag and as if we had nothing else. As a result, we had a much better appreciation for what it would be like, could execute very quickly, and modified our stash based on what worked/didn’t.

  42. There no mention of a knife? A Swiss army knife or a multi-tool should be added. It has scissors, can opener, blades to cut stuff and other thinks that could come in dang handy. You could also add a small spool of fishing line and I would also add a small pencil sharpener. That can be used to make shavings to help start a fire

  43. A lot of very good ideas. Some one said water purification tablets. I watch Survivor man on TV and he never uses them? I was never in a disaster but I was in the army for 2 years. as a boy scout we were always taught to carry some fishing line, hook and compass.

  44. ( I lived for 2 years in the Alaskan bush. You people are all going to die, you know that, right?) I would have to agree with him, I live in a log cabin off grid in the Yukon for 20+ years now it is tough but would not change it. I do not mean to insult the ones that do not. But you can not live off a BOB or a bucket. So Train, Train, TRAIN. Same as Practice, Practice etc, lean DIY

  45. Every time I read these list, no matter who writes it, they leave out one of the most important items. Toilet paper!

  46. i am a beginner prepper. i want to prep for job loss first, then power outages, then weather related emergencies and then global collapse. I think you people should be working together instead of starting your own war in these comments. I thought preppers worked together as a team not against each other. guess I’ll just stay to myself prepping in my own little country home.

  47. To JD above. I am 50 and my sister is 55. We took what we had in our 72 our kits which was not much and did just what you suggested.

    One fall night, we decided to get our survival packs at 10:00 at night and go to the backyard and stay until morning, just using what we had in our packs. We made our own rule that once we walked out the back door that we could not come back into the house for anything until the sun come up. We couldn’t find any trees close enough together to put up our tarps for a tent so we had to cut a small tree down and then cut it into, cut the ends off and make another side to attach our tarps too. Our measly little rope broke so we had to tie shoe strings together and use them.

    My sister had not ate anything all day and she was about to starve so we decided to boil some of our water on our emergency can heater. It took 30 minutes for the water to boil but it finally boiled and we ate ramen noodles and a few crackers with peanut butter on them. The ground started getting damp and it was getting really cold. We forgot our jackets!!

    When we got through setting up camp with what we had and eating, it was 1:30 in the morning. We rolled up in Indian blankets and used our packs for pillows and my sister went to sleep but I could not sleep. I got scared because I heard wolves howling and because I was froze to death. I had to go potty so I went a little ways in the woods and had to use a leaf because we forgot toilet paper. My sister went straight to sleep and was snoring. I woke her up and told her I quit I gotta go in the house. She said good I couldn’t sleep either. lol

    When we got inside it was 3:00 am, I took a hot shower and went to bed in my warm cozy bedroom. Our families told us we were absolutely crazy but whether we are or not as yet to be seen. The next morning when we got up we made a list of things we wished we would have had over a cup of hot coffee. The first thing I wrote down was a tent, jacket, a warmer blanket and some padding under it!!

  48. Please do not use a tampon to plug a bullet hole it has something in it that keeps blood from clotting so it’s really not a good idea

    • This was so fascinating. I spent much of the night reading and I learned so much. I plan on taking notes then use them to start my own survival plan. I keep thinking about my 4 grandchildren.
      Thank you to all who contributed!

  49. also include some thin. wire for making snares to catch animals for food. its lightweight and dosent take up a lot of space .

  50. When not if…SHTF… I am minimally prepared, but I am not worried because my God shall supply all my needs…and if I happen to die, I am not worried about that either, I know where I will spend eternity and its definitely not here.

  51. I DON’T THINK IT IS THE JOB OF ANY PERSON TO PUT SOMEONE ELSE DOWN….PEOPLE PREPARE IN THEIR OWN WAY…..IF YOU LIVE IN ALASKA, NEW YORK OR TEXAS WE ARE IN THIS TOGETHER….SO DO THE BEST YOU CAN AND HOPE ( PRAY ) FOR THE BEST……

  52. One thing I don’t see in anybody’s list is a recent photograph of all your family members. What if one of your children is away from home when SHTF, maybe at school or at a friends house. You would want to be able to show people a picture to see if they had seen your child. Also you should have a meeting place set up that all family members know about, such as by the swings in the park or the church across the street from the school.

  53. A great article, thank you for all the work that went into this. The pictures combined with lists makes it especially useful. A printed PDF would also be great!

    If you are storing an emergency radio and batteries, make sure you put them in an EMP bag. A plastic bucket will keep it nice and dry and handy, but an EMP bag will also protect from electric disasters. My two cents.

  54. Super glue for minor cuts. My daughter had several cuts that needed stitches but doc used derma bond…. I asked if it was super glue. He didn’t say say yes or no but gave me the look that told me yes. I’ve used it on myself and it worked great.

  55. A bunch of good advice. One thing if I may, turn the buckets into faraday containers. Copper mesh lined buckets and lids, just make sure that it becomes a completely enclosed cage when it’s closed.

  56. there is no survival tactic which will enable u to develop the mindset to survive…its like anything else…sum peeps better at “fill in da blank”…n with that said, u need to face up to the realistic notion, u probly wont survive. u may be better off joinin nwo facility. all dis preppin shit is jus that, shit. fa get about it…enjoy ea n every moment like its da last, cuz it may jus be….

  57. Be very sure to carry Cayenne Pepper in your packs.It can keep you from bleeding to death in case of a gunshot or other injury.Just poor Cayenne into wound and it will stop the bleeding.It will also stop a heart attack or stroke by adding 1 tablespoon to a cup of hot water and ingesting.

  58. I like your list but I was wondering if I could get a copy sent to me to print up. If that is possible, I would really appreciate it. thank you

  59. Native Americans survived for centuries in this great land using natural items and WORKING TOGETHER. People will have a harder time surviving alone, you need to find others whom you can trust, because I’m not good with electrical stuff, I’m not inventive, but I’m good at sewing and cooking over a fire and know a lot of wild plants…MOSS was traditionally used during a woman’s period to absorb and it’s antibacterial as well, so forget the pads people use what’s around you! And a knife is your number one item, but I agree a lot of people can’t start a fire without a fire starter so practice practice first!! Good luck everyone, I believe disease will be the next pandemic that will force people out of the city or governmental fall and anarchy. Why can’t we just all respect and love each other it’s not easy for any of us to survive our daily lives let alone a form of an apocalypse. Sad that people have to hurt each other and put others down.

  60. I agree with posters who talk about learning natural medicinals. We have started using essential oils for their healing properties and have had great results. I like learning what plants can be used just like prescription meds. Also someoil rinses kill sinus infections, garlic oil kills ear infections and strep. I could go on and on. Some of these oils have a stable shelf life of 8-10 years, and you only need a few drops.

  61. In my go bag I havea camelback,whistle,signal mirror,compass,ka bar knife,ductape,waterproof matches,firestarter,small portablestove with mess kit and fuel for stove,100ft paracord,couple multitools pen and notebook a deck of cards,a small inspirational book,a hat 3 pairs of sock underwear (soon to be a couple shirts and a good pair of jeans) couple ponchos,hand warmers, couple ace bandages,a nice sized first aid kit with snake bytekit(gonna be an epi pen) emergency fishing kit,couple flash lights,water purification tablets, couple bandanas,mechanics gloves, 3mre’s ,that’s it I think …for now anyways!

  62. Epi Pens would be an addition for our family as well; however, they do expire, so remember to keep track of the expiration date and resupply as needed.

    Was it really necessary to post an entire argument over the use of tampons? Really? Not every thought in a person’s head should be aired online.

  63. I read through the list and came up with just a few more items I’d add to the whole thing,
    1) old fashioned ball point pen and a pen knife (emergency trach)
    2) witch hazel – comes in small bottles and has numerous uses
    3) waterproof plastic bobble with 25-50 ft fishing line, a couple hooks, and a couple plastic worms, a few sinkers and a small bobber
    4) 1 qt pot and 2 collapsible cups – or one good old fashioned boy scouts traveling mess kit :)
    5) Bleach tablets (a bottle of 20 of them is an inch and a quarter by an inch and a quarter by 2 and half inches tall

  64. On Naked and afraid the three popular survival items are: Fire starter, a water boiling pot, a machete or hatchet. These people last twenty one days naked with only two of these items. : ) The bucket kit is a luxury kit.

  65. Thanks for all the good suggestions. I live in a CA earthquake area and my biggest fear is I will be at work and my kids at home 20 miles away. No phones, roads destroyed, how do I get to them?

  66. My husband and I more or less live in a big rig..being on the road 24/7 worries me non-stop. We keep water and food on the truck but we can only have so much weight. We’ll never know where we’ll be if or when all heck breaks out. Any suggestions??

  67. I’ve spent the last hour reading through all of this. I’m just getting started and I appreciate most of the comments. I do have a place where I can go and be safe. However, can I somehow get a list of “stuff” I should have? I can’t afford a camper, but I have a remote cabin in the woods. What else should I do?

  68. Great suggestions, lots of ideas here. A few additions:

    Make sure the bucket is food-grade. The orange Home Depot one pictured is not. You may want to store drinking water in it.

    Also, I’d wrap the AM/FM radio in alternating layers of aluminum foil and saran wrap that will protect in the event of a nuclear/EMP event.

  69. Even though you are using one of our product images as your main image on your article, it has been labeled with DIY even though SafeTkits and http://www.safetykitstore.com is a manufacturer and emergency kit assembly company in California. You can purchase ready made kits like the ones shown in the main article image directly from us along with supplies to further complete your emergency kit. Unfortunately even though our image is being used we did not see our company SafeTkit mentioned in the article and wanted to make sure all readers know where to get their emergency and disaster supplies. Thank you and be safe.

    • Thanks for letting us know! I see now that the buckets say “safetykit” on the side. I’ll make sure to credit your website with a link directly to where customers can buy the bucket safety kits right below the image.

  70. Another item that would be good to include, is a compact bow and arrows. If you are a good shot, then this can act as both a protective weapon and a weapon for food. but need to practice practice, practice. Be sure to work with the bow in different enviroments, such as screaming hot weather and freezing cold. Know how your body reacts to each when using the bow, also know if you can shoot decent when its really windy or rainy. Learn how to accomadate your aim for the weather around you. There are places all over the country that can help teach you this. just need to have the will to learn!

  71. Not everyone is planning for the zombie apocalypse but for much more likely local emergencies. Our current plans are a 72 hr pack for temporary evacuation. A car kit for winter driving. Then for a winter lights out due to weather, so bug in, Longer term is an aim to become more sustainable, not particularly for the full world catastrophe, but for personal financial security. When the paid job unexpectedly goes, which it can very easily. Then knowing we can still eat and have a roof over our heads makes this type of disaster easier to cope with.

  72. Thanks for the bucket post! I need to make one for the car too, only with break-down-in-winter, supplies!

    For all you gloomydoomy types posting; this bucket is obviously a short term survival pack for something like a flood, hurricane, earthquake, not the end of the world. (You’d need a much bigger bucket harhar). I’d say it’s good for getting you to the relief tents.

    Btw did I skim over some type of water cleaning kit? That would be important as carrying water adds alot of weight.

    • Yeah the lifestraw is mentioned because it is very compact. A small camp stove would be a more primitive solution to cleaning water too.

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